“The Easy Ways” by Jim Fusco Album Release Party Concert – Full Video!

Happy 2015, everyone!  For my first post of the year, I’m proud to bring you the full video from my concert celebrating the release of my 2014 album, “The Easy Ways”!  In this concert, I play the album in its entirety.  I made a special mix of the album without the lead vocals and lead guitar.  So, I was able to play alongside that backing track to give the audience a real preview of what the album sounded like!

We had a great turnout and performance went off without a hitch.  If you weren’t able to make it, it’s a great opportunity to watch and listen to the whole album!  And, if you went, I’m sure you’ll want to relive the concert again and again. :-)

The concert, like the album, is split into two sections.  So, make sure to watch both videos.  I’d love to hear any comments about the album and hope everyone enjoys.

Weezer’s “Hurley” (2010) – The Weekend Review

Originally posted 2010-10-18 21:57:11. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Chris Moore:

RATING:  3.5 / 5 stars

Simply put, Hurley is Weezer’s return to high energy rock music.

And it’s good.

Okay, so I’ll admit that it is difficult to take an album like Hurley seriously, given the ostensibly random title and accompanying cover photo that is apropos of nothing contained within.  And yet, you should endeavor to get past the cover, the pathetic excuse for CD packaging, and the bad press the album has received from those who, on the heels of Raditude, understandably won’t give it a chance, including — perhaps most notably — one James Burns, a man currently engaged in a campaign to raise $10 million as incentive for Weezer to break up.

I would suggest that he give this album a chance, but it turns out he not only is not but also has never been a fan of the band.

This is such a pity, as Hurley is an album so true to classic Weezer that it makes more sense to compare it to The Green Album (2001) than any of the four subsequent releases.  Aside from the echoes of Raditude on “Smart Girls,” the rock sensibility of Hurley extends past the experimental aura of The Red Album, doesn’t quite match the tone of Make Believe, and is certainly not cut out of the same carefully orchestrated hard rock fabric that defined Maladroit.

Musically, the track listing conjures those early albums: a total running time that barely cracks the half hour mark across ten songs with concise titles, all upbeat rock tracks with distorted guitars that play like a mix between garage rock and clean studio sounds.

As for the cover, I have never understood the criticism lobbed at The Red Album and Raditude.  Because a man who looks like a doll reading a newspaper wasn’t weird.  Neither, apparently, was several depressed looking cartoons wearing the traditional garb of the Orient wandering aimlessly around a snowy mountainside.  And four guys standing in front of a bright blue screen looking like they’d forgotten it was picture day wasn’t odd; that was somehow classic.

Hurley (Weezer, 2010)

Hurley (Weezer, 2010)

Weezer has always been quirky, and that has always been a large part of their appeal.  In a manner that should be palatable to the average rock fan, they have assembled Hurley as a return to that form, with a couple worthwhile variations thrown in for good measure.

The opening track and lead single “Memories” is honest, in-your-face rock music that begins with reminiscences that would have fit in comfortably on The Red Album, but quickly transitions to a catchy chorus and a middle stirred to perfection with a shredded vocal delivery by Rivers Cuomo.

He loosens the reigns vocally on several other occasions, not the least of which is that pinnacle of quirkiness “Where’s My Sex?,” the shtick here being that the word “sex” replaces the word “socks” throughout the song.  The result is a rocking, if somewhat ridiculous, track.

“Unspoken” is an acoustic gem, but even this song can’t help but rock out in the latter half, just as “Time Flies” wants to be the pensive closer, yet is so steady in beat as to evade the classification as a “slow song.”

Although many of the strongest tracks are placed early on the record — “Trainwrecks” being one, if not the, standout song — even the potentially mediocre numbers, like “Smart Girls” and “Brave New World,” achieve cohesion and momentum.  “Ruling Me,” “Run Away,” and “Hang On” are similarly impressive in their focus and balance between simplicity and interesting vocal and instrumental hooks.

This isn’t the new Weezer classic.  It shouldn’t be interpreted as the new Green Album, nor should it be compared to the heights of their career, in 1994 and 2002.  And yet, as much as Make Believe was underrated (and sadly oversimplified as “the one with ‘Beverly Hills’ on it”)  and as much as The Red Album grew on me and quickly became a favorite of mine in 2008, Hurley is arguably the best rock album Weezer has produced in eight years.

If nothing else, it provides proof positive that this band has not gone off the deep end (band-led hootenannies and Rivers Cuomo’s train conductor’s uniform notwithstanding). Hurley can be read as a nod to fans of their rock mentality, and the message is clear: this is a band that can still rock…. when they want to.

“Society” by Jerry Hannan (Covered by Eddie Vedder for the Into the Wild Soundtrack) – Chords, Tabs, & How to Play

Originally posted 2009-06-08 22:37:17. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Jerry Hannan (Covered by Eddie Vedder for the Into the Wild soundtrack)

INTRO: Am (hum over chord)

C       G              C
It’s a mystery to me;
We have a greed
C      F                       G
With which we have agreed.

G           F
And you think you have to
G                           Am
Want more than you need;
F                         G
Until you have it all,
G                 Am
You won’t be free…

Am    F
F                     C
You’re a crazy breed.
C                         G
I hope you’re not lonely
G          Am
Without me.

When you want more than you have,
You think you need.
And when you think more than you want,
Your thoughts begin to bleed.

I think I need to find a bigger place,
Cause when you have
More than you think,
You need more space…

You’re a crazy breed.
I hope you’re not lonely
Without me.

Crazy indeed;
Hope you’re not lonely
Without me.

INSTRUMENTAL:  Over verse and chorus chords

There’s those thinking more less,
Less is more.
But if less is more,
How you keepin’ score?

Means for every point you make,
Your level drops,
Kinda like you’re startin’ from the top,
And you can’t do that…

You’re a crazy breed.
I hope you’re not lonely
Without me.

Crazy indeed;
Hope you’re not lonely
Without me.

Have mercy on me;
Hope you’re not angry
If I disagree.

Crazy indeed;
Hope you’re not lonely
Without me.

** These chords and lyrics are interpretations and transcriptions, respectively, and are the sole property of the copyright holder(s). They are posted on this website free of charge for no profit for the purpose of study and commentary, as allowed for under the “fair use” provision of U.S. copyright law, and should only be used for such personal and/or academic work. **

“Goin’ South” (Beach Boys Cover)

Originally posted 2008-03-01 14:29:18. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Jim Fusco:

Hello everyone and welcome to another edition of the Laptop Sessions and another in our series of Beach Boys cover songs videos!

I’m very excited about todays video for two reasons- I think it’s one of my best performances so far, plus it only took me one take to do it! I just kept practicing over the past few days and it really clicked.

Today’s song is a seldom-heard one from the Beach Boys called “Goin’ South”, written mainly by Carl Wilson.

I thought of doing this song when I heard about the impending snow storm we got last night here in CT. So, it was nice to record a song about “going south for the winter” while it was actually snowing!

I hope that everyone enjoys today’s session and that winter, in fact, does end soon. Because it IS gettin’ mighty cold and I’m hoping it gets mighty warm very soon.