“Lay Lady Lay” (Bob Dylan Cover)

Originally posted 2007-12-16 18:28:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Jim Fusco:

Back again for more Laptop Sessions! It’s been a while, but now that the planning is finally done for our annual Christmas/New Year’s party, I’ll be back doing more sessions more often! So, today, I’m actually putting four new videos online, as these were salvaged from my last laptop’s hard drive before it died. Props to me, though, because I uploaded these to my web space before the hard drive crashed! :-)

“Lay Lady Lay” is an oddity. If you listen to Dylan’s Greatest Hits/Best Of compilations, you’ll notice that this song stands out from the rest because of, dare I say it, his good voice! For the album “Nashville Skyline” (one of my favorites), he decided to try a new style of singing and playing. Chris and I put a new spin on this song with a guitar solo, and I hope everyone likes what we’ve done with it, especially because it took about 34 takes!

Stay tuned for part 2 of today’s 4 part Laptop Sessions extravaganza!



“Tangled Up in Blue” (Bob Dylan Cover)

Originally posted 2008-02-16 12:36:30. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Chris Moore:

I’ve recorded a series of Bob Dylan songs for the Laptop Sessions, and yet I haven’t recorded any songs from one of his best albums, Blood on the Tracks. From the moment I heard “Tangled Up in Blue,” I’ve always loved this song. I think it’s the story and how — even though it’s a classic structure of verse, bridge, chorus (repeat seven times) — the story shifts after every chorus. My favorite alternate version of this song is from his 1984 live album Real Live. I was caught off guard by this version, as Dylan changes a good portion of the lyrics and shifts the perspective of the narrator.

When Jim and I went to see Dylan a couple years ago in the rain in an open field (which was a less than pleasant way to spend $60!), the highlight of the show was probably when one of the band members broke out an acoustic guitar and Dylan sang a rockin’ “Tangled Up in Blue.” We were still soaked, but it helped make up for it…

I hope you enjoy tonight’s Bob Dylan acoustic cover song version of “Tangled Up In Blue” here on the Laptop Sessions music video blog. Stay tuned for even more music videos of your favorite songs from your favorite songwriters- all done acoustically!



“Every Grain of Sand” (Bob Dylan Cover)

Originally posted 2010-02-05 23:30:02. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Federico Borluzzi:

Unplugged cover of Bob Dylan’s “Every Grain Of Sand” (from the Shot Of Love album – 1981), with acoustic guitar and harmonica.  I changed the two harmonica solos to fit my harmonica skills (I have a lot to learn before I can play exactly what Dylan plays) and the possibilities of my G tuned harmonica.

** EDITOR’S NOTE: **

In his first contribution to the Laptop Sessions acoustic cover song music video blog, Federico has chosen a beautiful little number.  I wonder if he was aware of my love for Bob Dylan when he decided to submit this video…

He certainly couldn’t have been aware of how much I love this underrated gem of an album, Shot of Love.  Often considered the third in his “born-again Christian trilogy” of studio albums, Shot of Love is actually more of a transition album.  Critics tore this release apart, often with the exception of “Every Grain of Sand.”  And, truly, Federico couldn’t have chosen a better song to translate into an acoustic cover.  Although his harmonica is not spot-on, it is clearly because of the key the harmonica is in.  He has a knack for matching the fingerpicking pattern as well as the harmonica tabs — any Dylan fan will be able to hear how close his solo is to the original, all except for the key, that is.

And, again, I’m thrilled at his choice of album.  Shot of Love may have been panned by fans and critics alike, but there are some excellent tracks.  Consider “Heart of Mine,” percussion by none other than Ringo Starr.  Then, there’s the striking “Lenny Bruce.”  “Property of Jesus” may be dismissed as just another “Christian song,” but it’s a catchy and effective one.  And, although it wasn’t included on pressings until four years later, “The Groom’s Still Waiting at the Altar” is a phenomenal Dylan track.

So, listen to Federico’s first session, and get out there and listen to Shot of Love if you’ve been missing out all these years!

Bob Dylan’s “Bob Dylan” (1962) – Yes, No, or Maybe So

Originally posted 2010-05-03 22:30:24. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Bob Dylan’s Bob Dylan (1962) – MAYBE

Bob Dylan's self-titled debut (1962)

Bob Dylan's self-titled debut (1962

(March 19, 1962)

Review:

It is difficult to imagine a time when Bob Dylan was not revered as a songwriter, but here is one of the true documents of that time; it is an album that exemplifies young Dylan’s early sound, as he experimented with his influences on some of his first cover song recordings  and presented the first two originals he committed to an album (the early, touching gem “Song to Woody” and the raw, poetically humorous “Talkin’ New York”).

Top Two Tracks:

“Song to Woody” & “House of the Risin’ Sun”