“Tomorrow Never Knows” (Bruce Springsteen Cover)

Originally posted 2010-03-06 20:45:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Federico Borluzzi:

Acoustic cover of “Tomorrow Never Knows,” from Bruce Springsteen’s Working On A Dream album (2009).

** EDITOR’S NOTE: **

Tonight, I’m happy to add another cover song from Federico. This time around, he’s picked a beautiful little gem from Bruce Springsteen’s latest album. “Tomorrow Never Knows” may conjure memories of the classic Beatles tune of the same name, but it’s an entirely different track, believe me. If you’ve heard the original, then you know that this is an excellent choice for an acoustic cover song.

We hope you enjoy Federico’s Guest Session — leave comments, submit a session of your own (click on “The Guest Sessions in the weekly calendar above), or simply kick back and listen!

“Working On A Dream” by Bruce Springsteen – Chords, Tabs, and How to Play

Originally posted 2009-02-01 18:59:15. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

“Working On A Dream”
Bruce Springsteen

(Capo 5)

G
Out here the nights are long, the days are lonely.

I think of you, and I’m working on a

D

dream…

I’m working on a

G

dream.

The cards I’ve drawn’s a rough hand, darlin’ —
I straighten my back, and I’m working on a dream…
I’m working on a dream.

G                           C                                            G
I’m working on a dream, though it feels so far away.
G                           C                                                          D
I’m working on a dream, and I know it will be mine some day.

Rain pourin’ down, I swing my hammer.
My hands are rough from working on a dream…
I’m working on a dream.

I’m working on a dream, though trouble can feel like it’s here to stay.
I’m working on a dream; our love will chase the trouble away.

I’m working on a dream, though it can feel so far away.
I’m working on a dream, and our love will make it real some day.

Sunrise come, I climb the ladder.
The new day breaks, and I’m working on a dream…
I’m working on a dream.
I’m working on a dream…
I’m working on a dream.

I’m working on a dream, though it can feel so far away.
I’m working on a dream, and our love will make it real some day.

I’m working on a dream, though it can feel so far away.
I’m working on a dream, and our love will make it real some day.

** These chords and lyrics are interpretations and transcriptions, respectively, and are the sole property of the copyright holder(s). They are posted on this website free of charge for no profit for the purpose of study and commentary, as allowed for under the “fair use” provision of U.S. copyright law, and should only be used for such personal and/or academic work. **

CD Review: Bruce Springsteen’s “Devils and Dust”

Originally posted 2008-06-26 13:34:57. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

RATING:  2 / 5 stars

By Chris Moore:

I had read many reviews of this album long before I ever listened to it, and they were all good. They weren’t simply good reviews. Rather, Rolling Stone among others made this out to be the most incredible Springsteen album in years, if ever. Thus, my expectations were high when I bought Devils and Dust late one night and eagerly cranked it up for my half hour drive home.

The first track—the title track—is a nice start to a dark album, but I found myself disappointed quickly. Perhaps it was because I expected more upbeat songs, a la The Rising. Or perhaps it was because I was driving home with the windows open, cool breeze in my face, and I was having trouble hearing what Springsteen was singing. Whatever the reason, I quickly became disappointed with the release and told my friends why I thought it was overrated.

While I have not decided to declare this a veritable masterpiece that I initially overlooked, I must admit that my opinion of the album has softened with time. What helped to change my mind was viewing the DVD side of this DualDisc release. While the stripped-down nature of the studio recordings initially turned me off—and I usually have nothing against bare bones recordings—his live, solo acoustic performances allowed me to hear the songs for themselves, independent of my initial expectations. Springsteen appeared Dylan-esque, complete with acoustic guitar and harmonica rack. I loved “Devils and Dust” all the more here for its directness, for its simplicity. Suddenly, it was as though he was singing an old folk song—a well-written, dark yet catchy number. “Long Time Comin’” stood out to me again, having been one of my favorite album tracks.

There was something in Springsteen’s commentary in between songs that captured my interest and sparked my respect for the man. He seemed to be legitimately interested in writing minimalist songs as personal narratives both autobiographical and fictional. “Reno” is the perfect example of this captivating and revolting blend between the real and the conjured, the noble and the pitiful that he is able to weave together so well. In the best songs on this album, Springsteen exposes a subtle poetic sensibility that lends credibility and interest to his work. In subsequent listenings, I have found myself most taken in by these occasionally vivid and descriptive turns of phrase.

Still, I don’t quite understand some of the choices he made for the songs on this album. For instance, why did he sing the penultimate track, “All I’m Thinkin’ About,” in the odd, cracked voice manner that he did? Furthermore, why did he choose some of the subject matter that he did? What are the Matamoros Banks and would it make a difference if we knew? After all, I wonder why he would sing such a pretty song about a place that I have difficulty relating to, even after he has described it through his song. These are the moments — hearing him sing in unusual manners for no apparent reason and memorializing specific places that I have difficulty understanding the importance of — that I wonder what is so masterful about this album. It is a decent album, to be sure, and contains some good songs, but it is more of a return to roots than a step forward.

For all that I am impressed with the earthiness of the songs, the fervent attention to immortalizing the devils and the dust, I am still most in awe of a song like “Jesus Was An Only Son.” For its interesting depiction of an oft-discussed historical figure/son of God/son of man, for its flowing tune, and for its haunting organ riffing in the background, I wonder what the album would have been like if as much attention had been paid to the other tracks.

While its slow, gritty ballads pay homage to its namesake, I can’t help but note that if the album had been comprised of “Devils and Dust”’s and “Jesus Was An Only Son”’s, I may have called it masterful.

2005

“Hungry Heart” (Bruce Springsteen Cover)

Originally posted 2008-07-11 22:08:39. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Jim Fusco:

How is it even possible that we can keep rolling out quality new music artists like Bruce Springsteen here on the Laptop Sessions acoustic song music video blog? I mean, we have over 80 categories now on the site, and we STILL have not done a song from such heavy-hitters as the Rolling Stones & Crosby, Stills, and Nash. But, with time, we’ll be adding these great bands and musicians to our catalog of acoustic cover songs.

Tonight, I bring you our first-ever Bruce Springsteen song, dedicated to my good friend, and fellow Mets fan, John Grabar, a huge Springsteen fan. Honestly, there are many songs from Springsteen that I’d like to do for future Laptop Sessions, but this one always struck me as catchy and meaningful. But, I will admit, it was only a few years ago that I learned this was actually Bruce singing the lead to this tune! I mean, it barely sounds like him, especially like he sounds in such hits as “My Hometown”.

“Hungry Heart” is one of those special songs that honestly has four chords (save for the ten second interlude in the middle) and the same chords repeat for the verse and the chorus. I mean, if you can get away with it, make a good song, and sell a ton of copies, then why not?

Well, that’s all for me tonight. You’ll remember it was three weeks ago that I gave the reigns over to Chris and Jeff for the weekend and the website went down for three days. Of course, it wasn’t their fault AT ALL, but it’s still fun to tease them about it. I’m planning on meeting my good friends Dave and Dana tomorrow night for a beer, and I’m really looking forward to it. Now that things are (finally) stable here on the blog, I can start to prioritize my life again…without making “fix the blog” come in at #1.