“My Brave Face” (Paul McCartney Cover)

Originally posted 2008-05-09 20:42:48. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Jim Fusco:

Welcome to your Friday edition of the Laptop Sessions with me, Jim Fusco!

Tonight, I bring you a cool tune from Paul McCartney, “My Brave Face”. I always knew of this song, hearing it on the radio and such, but for some reason, I fell in love with it a couple years ago. I guess I never really knew it was Paul.

It’s a TOUGH song to sing and I just can’t seem to shake this cold lately, but I prepped myself by eating and drinking a lot before I did the take. It always makes me feel better.

There’s also some really tough lines to sing, as they have this odd syncopation to them. The line, “Ever since you left I have been trying to compose a ‘baby will you please come home’ note meant for you”. Are you kidding me? It took a while to get that one down.

But, I really like the way the whole video came out and I think you’ll agree it’s one of my more passionate ones.

Enjoy tonight’s video and make sure to get yourself back to http://www.LaptopSessions.com tomorrow for another new video from the one and only Chris Moore!


“Clocks” by Coldplay – Chords, Tabs, & How To Play

Originally posted 2008-04-21 00:33:33. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

CLOCKS
By Coldplay
Chords Used:
Abm	4 6 6 4 4 4
Eb	6 6 8 8 8 6
Bbm	6 8 8 6 6 6
F#maj7	2 4 3 3 2 2
C#	4 4 6 6 6 4
Eb	Bbm	Abm
Eb	Bbm	Abm

Eb                  Bbm

Lights go out and I can't be saved

Ab

Tides that I tried to swim against

Eb                     Bbm

Have brought me down upon my knees

Ab

Oh I beg, I beg and please, singing

Eb                Bbm

Come out of the things unsaid
Ab
Shoot an apple off my head
Eb            Bbm
And a trouble that can't be named
Ab
A tiger's waiting to be tamed, singing
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	Ab
Eb	Bbm	Ab
Eb               Bbm
Confusion that never stops
Ab
Closing walls and ticking clocks
Eb                     Bbm
Gonna come back and take you home
Ab
I could not stop, that you now know
Eb          Bbm
Singing come out upon my seas
Ab
Curse missed opportunities
Eb            Bbm
Am I a part of the cure
Ab
Or am I part of the disease, singing
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	Ab
Eb	Bbm	Ab
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
F#                    C#
And nothing else compares
F#                    C#
And nothing else compares
F#                    C#
And nothing else compares
F#                    C#
And nothing else compares
Eb	Bbm	Ab
Eb	Bbm	Ab
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb	Bbm	 Ab
Yooooouuuuu arrrreeee
Eb     Bbm
Ab
Home, home, where I wanted to go
Eb     Bbm                      Ab
Home, home, where I wanted to go
Eb     Bbm                      Ab
Home, home, where I wanted to go
Eb     Bbm                      Ab
Home, home, where I wanted to go

Music Review: Marcy Playground’s “Leaving Wonderland…in a fit of rage”

Originally posted 2009-07-28 01:39:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

RATING:  3 / 5 stars

By Chris Moore:

To be honest, Marcy Playground is a band I had forgotten about, leaving them behind in a hazy collection of other nineties modern rock one hit wonders.

Out of sheer curiosity, I felt the urge to hear this most recent album from the “Sex and Candy” singer — it was originally slated as a John Wozniak solo project — that I came across on the Newbury Comics new release rack.  (It certainly didn’t hurt that the disc came with a free download of their previous album, the aptly titled third release from the band: MP3.)

I didn’t expect much, considering that over a decade had passed since I had heard a song from the band.  I always liked “Sex and Candy,” but even in 1997 I knew it was a fairly straightforward track made notable only by its provocative lyrics and Wozniak’s low, unique vocal tones.

What I got was a solid album comprised predominantly of an artist’s exploration of the roots of his music.  Throughout Leaving Wonderland…in a fit of rage, Wozniak’s songwriting is simple and the band’s arrangements are as standard as they come.

When I use the term “solid,” I mean that Marcy Playground’s fourth release is comprised of generally enjoyable songs placed in an effective order to not only keep the listener’s attention, but also to contribute to a largely common set of themes.

And, yes, beyond all these qualifications that I am making, there exists the realization that a “solid” album may be listened to and even appreciated, but it is nothing special.

As with their late nineties single, one of the greatest strengths of the album is Wozniak’s signature vocals.  Throughout the album, he weaves tales of sorrow, loss, and reconsideration.  Whatever “Wonderland” represents for Marcy Playground’s John Wozniak — a relationship or fame to name just a couple possibilities — the exit from said Wonderland is indeed a violent one, soaked in booze and drugs and, at times, literally marked by flames.

“Blackbird,” the opening track and the first US single, sets the tone for what is a heavily acoustic record, a notable departure from their previous release.  “Irene” and “Memphis” are so acoustic and rootsy that they sound as though they were snatched from a decades old country/folk record.

Meanwhile, the album is spiced up by tracks like “Devil Woman” and “Good Times” — the first Canadian single — which are predominantly acoustic, and yet endowed with a heavy beat and a set of catchy vocals.

Of course, the album is not without its electric touches.  “I Must Have Been Dreaming” is a clean and catchy cut, but “I Burned the Bed” and “Emperor” are drenched in distortion and lie at the heart of this album, both thematically and musically.  “Gin and Money” offers the complete package — opening with a nearly tribal beat, subtle but integral piano, and acoustic fingerpicking before kicking into high gear with a little feedback and a lot of spirited vocals and electric guitar.

Overall, I score this album as a “Maybe Not.”  I’m glad I bought it, and I’ve listened to it almost twenty times already.  I truly enjoy many of the tracks, and Wozniak has crafted the order to ebb and flow at just the right times.

However, what doesn’t hit home with me is the simplicity of the lyrics — referring to himself directly in “Good Times,” taking the bright and instantly-stuck-in-your-head “Star Baby” and crippling it with cheesiness, and feeding into some middle school-worthy rhymes in “Thank You,” to name a few instances.  This is my most significant criticism; even the largely predictable arrangements fit within the larger context of the album.

This is an album about coming to terms with the universal thematic subject matter of love and youth lost, of having to grow up after having lost something to the ravages of time.  If you can look past the simplicity of many of the thoughts being conveyed, then this album is worth a listen.

If not, then it might be time for you to go back to the classics — Dylan, Beatles, etc.  Or at least to last year’s Counting Crows album.

“Church on Sunday” (Green Day Acoustic Rock Cover)

We’re looking for more Guest Sessions submissions! So, sit down, pull up your acoustic guitar and camera, post the video on YouTube, and CLICK HERE!

It’s finally Friday and it’s time to add yet another guest to this, the Guest Sessions project, hosted at the best cover song and new music video blog on the web — the Laptop Sessions!

For tonight’s video, we are happy to bring you only the second Green Day cover that’s been released on the blog.  Tonight’s guest comes to you from Bournemouth, UK.  Isn’t that the beauty of the Internet?  Mike White, our “Guest” performer, can record a video in the UK and I can post it on this music video blog while sitting in bed in Connecticut, United States.  We’ve become so used to this web that it’s not all that amazing to most of us, particularly the younger generation (myself included).  I take it for granted sometimes, but every so often I step back and consider how amazing this really is…

Tonight’s selection is “Church on Sunday,” the third track on Green Day’s Warning: album.  Warning: was released in 2000 and rose to both gold status and number 4 on the Billboard charts.  Even still, this was the least impressive showing the band had ever had, since their debut album Dookie. What makes material from Warning: ideal for the Laptop Sessions, though, is the fact that this album incorporates acoustic elements more than any previous Green Day release.

And you may be seeing another Green Day cover song soon, as the band is planning to release their new album, 21st Century Breakdown, in May 2009.  Supposedly, it has been strongly influenced by the work of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, and the Beatles, and is “more power pop than punk.”  Interesting… (I hope…)

So, without further ado, you should click on the video below and let Mike White’s energetic performance speak for itself!