“Sour Girl” (Stone Temple Pilots Cover)

Originally posted 2008-03-31 20:55:45. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

By Jim Fusco:

Welcome to another Monday, Monday version of the Laptop Sessions!

Back here with my first video from Stone Temple Pilots, a band Jeff got me into. I love a lot of their hits, but this one clearly stood out to me. Anyone who’s familiar with my musical tastes will be able to figure out why.

“Sour Girl” has some great singing, a great tune, and an interesting message about a girl who seems very unhappy while around the singer, and happy when she looks away. What great fodder for a song!

Now, I need to mention this, and I hope my upwards of 100 subscribers will check this out:


It’s called Homestead’s Revenge (by Masters of the Universe- the band I’m in) and the entire album will be available to listen to after midnight on the 1st. Plus, you can buy the high quality mp3s or the CD version. Here’s the web address:


PLEASE check it out and let me know what you think!

I hope you all enjoy today’s Session, and REALLY enjoy the new album- it’s two years in the making!

Music Review: Marcy Playground’s “Leaving Wonderland…in a fit of rage”

Originally posted 2009-07-28 01:39:28. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

RATING:  3 / 5 stars

By Chris Moore:

To be honest, Marcy Playground is a band I had forgotten about, leaving them behind in a hazy collection of other nineties modern rock one hit wonders.

Out of sheer curiosity, I felt the urge to hear this most recent album from the “Sex and Candy” singer — it was originally slated as a John Wozniak solo project — that I came across on the Newbury Comics new release rack.  (It certainly didn’t hurt that the disc came with a free download of their previous album, the aptly titled third release from the band: MP3.)

I didn’t expect much, considering that over a decade had passed since I had heard a song from the band.  I always liked “Sex and Candy,” but even in 1997 I knew it was a fairly straightforward track made notable only by its provocative lyrics and Wozniak’s low, unique vocal tones.

What I got was a solid album comprised predominantly of an artist’s exploration of the roots of his music.  Throughout Leaving Wonderland…in a fit of rage, Wozniak’s songwriting is simple and the band’s arrangements are as standard as they come.

When I use the term “solid,” I mean that Marcy Playground’s fourth release is comprised of generally enjoyable songs placed in an effective order to not only keep the listener’s attention, but also to contribute to a largely common set of themes.

And, yes, beyond all these qualifications that I am making, there exists the realization that a “solid” album may be listened to and even appreciated, but it is nothing special.

As with their late nineties single, one of the greatest strengths of the album is Wozniak’s signature vocals.  Throughout the album, he weaves tales of sorrow, loss, and reconsideration.  Whatever “Wonderland” represents for Marcy Playground’s John Wozniak — a relationship or fame to name just a couple possibilities — the exit from said Wonderland is indeed a violent one, soaked in booze and drugs and, at times, literally marked by flames.

“Blackbird,” the opening track and the first US single, sets the tone for what is a heavily acoustic record, a notable departure from their previous release.  “Irene” and “Memphis” are so acoustic and rootsy that they sound as though they were snatched from a decades old country/folk record.

Meanwhile, the album is spiced up by tracks like “Devil Woman” and “Good Times” — the first Canadian single — which are predominantly acoustic, and yet endowed with a heavy beat and a set of catchy vocals.

Of course, the album is not without its electric touches.  “I Must Have Been Dreaming” is a clean and catchy cut, but “I Burned the Bed” and “Emperor” are drenched in distortion and lie at the heart of this album, both thematically and musically.  “Gin and Money” offers the complete package — opening with a nearly tribal beat, subtle but integral piano, and acoustic fingerpicking before kicking into high gear with a little feedback and a lot of spirited vocals and electric guitar.

Overall, I score this album as a “Maybe Not.”  I’m glad I bought it, and I’ve listened to it almost twenty times already.  I truly enjoy many of the tracks, and Wozniak has crafted the order to ebb and flow at just the right times.

However, what doesn’t hit home with me is the simplicity of the lyrics — referring to himself directly in “Good Times,” taking the bright and instantly-stuck-in-your-head “Star Baby” and crippling it with cheesiness, and feeding into some middle school-worthy rhymes in “Thank You,” to name a few instances.  This is my most significant criticism; even the largely predictable arrangements fit within the larger context of the album.

This is an album about coming to terms with the universal thematic subject matter of love and youth lost, of having to grow up after having lost something to the ravages of time.  If you can look past the simplicity of many of the thoughts being conveyed, then this album is worth a listen.

If not, then it might be time for you to go back to the classics — Dylan, Beatles, etc.  Or at least to last year’s Counting Crows album.

Some great songs for Thanksgiving Day: A Playlist

By Chris Moore:

This Turkey Day, if you’re searching your shelves or mp3 player for some appropriate music, then look no further.  This morning, as I was preparing to seize the Thanksgiving Day, I began thinking about songs that I would like to hear throughout the day.  After some brainstorming of relevant topics and themes, and a great deal of musical exploration via my iTunes, I came up with the following list.

As you read through the list, you’ll notice the dual take on thanksgiving — the first set of songs are positive songs of “thanks,” while the second segment is devoted to more sarcastic takes on the sentiment.  Then come the songs about pilgrims and Native Americans, followed by tracks about food — what else?  Top it all off with a final set of songs about the family and Marcy Playground’s “Thank You,” and you’ve got yourself a Thanksgiving day playlist!

1)  “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again)” -Sly & The Family Stone

2)  “Thank You Girl” – The Beatles

3)  “Photo (The Thanksgiving Song)” – Mike Fusco

4)  “The Thanks I Get” – Wilco

5)  “Thank You for Sharing” – The Vanity Project

6)  “You To Thank” – Ben Folds

7)  “Thanks a Lot” – Third Eye Blind

8)  “Pilgrimage” – R.E.M.

9)  “Indian Reservation” – Paul Revere & the Raiders

10)  “Pilgrim” – Eric Clapton

11)  “Ten Little Indians” – The Beach Boys

12)  “Lone Pilgrim” – Bob Dylan

13)  “Food Party” – Barenaked Ladies

14)  “Vegetables” – The Beach Boys

15)  “Eat Healthy” – Jim Gaffigan

16)  “Family Affair” – Sly & The Family Stone

17)  “The Family Gardener” – Jeff Tweedy

18)  “Thank You” – Marcy Playground